What sets music apart from basic collections of sounds is that it contains a certain narrative. By arranging sounds into a certain following order, a story can be told that can even elicit certain emotions. As you might have noticed by now, we try to put that narrative into words the best we can. That’s because we think that it’s easier to identify with the music we love, if we tell you why we love it. So what we aim to do is telling stories about telling stories. On a meta level you could say.

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Artist: DJ Metatron
Title: U’ll Be The King Of The Stars
Label: Traumprinz
Catalog#: TRAUMPRINZ005
Releasedate: XX-12-2014

Buy: Clone

Social: Unknown

Image
Michael Hull: FLI

What sets music apart from basic collections of sounds is that it contains a certain narrative. By arranging sounds into a certain following order, a story can be told that can even elicit certain emotions. As you might have noticed by now, we try to put that narrative into words the best we can. That’s because we think that it’s easier to identify with the music we love, if we tell you why we love it. So what we aim to do is telling stories about telling stories. On a meta level you could say.

The artist we’re featuring today – DJ Metatron – is a fascinating story in itself. His musical style is evolving rapidly, and whenever a new phase arrives, he creates a new artistic persona. From the raw techno alias Prince of Denmark, to the dream-housy Traumprinz and now the cosmic giant DJ Metatron or ‘the king of stars’.

It’s not easy to figure out who is behind these personas. Or at least you won’t find it out after reading the first two pages of Google results. We probably could find out who he is, but we choose not to do so. It’s much more fun to fantasize about some Danish prince that starts out as your run of the mill prince, turns into a super-ego of himself and eventually evolves into a monstrous meta-beast of cosmic proportions. In that way it results into a story about a story about a story. How ‘meta’ is that?

Cédric
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Staring through the mirror. Transmitting the former self. Kurt Baggaley uncovered a theme. A theme of the ages. A theme with no clear beginning, nor end. The British producer has made a monumental effort of capturing, bending the sequence, making it’s frequencies audible for everyone to hear, for the select few to understand. A 13 minute manifestation that seems to be able to go on forever. Drifting away, time seems detached, reality becomes palpable and minds become entranced. Esoteric, arcane, inscrutable. This is your former self.

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Artist: Kurt Baggaley
Title: Former Self
Label: Something Happening Somewhere
Catalog#: SoHaSo005
Releasedate: 02-02-2015

Buy: Pre-order

Social
SoHaSo: WEBFB | SC
Kurt Baggaley: FB | SC

Image
 Tim Mossholder: WEB

Staring through the mirror. Transmitting the former self. Kurt Baggaley uncovered a theme. A theme of the ages. A theme with no clear beginning, nor end. The British producer has made a monumental effort of capturing, bending the sequence, making it’s frequencies audible for everyone to hear, for the select few to understand. A 13 minute manifestation that seems to be able to go on forever. Drifting away, time seems detached, reality becomes palpable and minds become entranced. Esoteric, arcane, inscrutable. This is your former self.

Moving far between audible dimensions, Nuno Dos Santos has made his next move, lifting the veil of this new release on his Something Happening Somewhere. Enlisting Kurt Baggaley for this EP, with Maeve’s The Drifter also delivering a staggering remix of the epic opening piece called ‘Former Self’. Taking the original arrangement and making it club-ready, The Drifter does exactly what’s needed, and more. Being able to keep the emotive payload intact while giving it the dancefloor treatment is more than impressive. It’s a triumph.

It’s time to forget time and drift off. To transmit. To receive. Open up, let the frequencies in. 

Florinsz Janvier
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For travelers traveling through unknown territory it is often difficult tot differentiate good situations from bad ones. You won’t interpret bad behavior as good, but you will be more held back and judge things as bad more likely, making it possible to miss out on great experiences. The same principle applies for music. Because it takes more energy and attention to judge a piece of music outside of your comfort zone based on neutral benchmarks, you often don’t take the time to do so. For both music and traveling this is a natural proces where with music, you develop your own taste and specific likings, and with traveling a good gut feeling can save you from trouble.

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Info
Artist: Flako
Title: Mating Dance
Label: Unknown
Catalog#: Unknown
Releasedate: 14-11-2012

Free download: XLR8R

Social
Flako: FB | SC

Image:
Nigel Lo: WEB

For travelers traveling through unknown territory it is often difficult tot differentiate good situations from bad ones. You won’t interpret bad behavior as good, but you will be more held back and judge things as bad more likely, making it possible to miss out on great experiences. The same principle applies for music. Because it takes more energy and attention to judge a piece of music outside of your comfort zone based on neutral benchmarks, you often don’t take the time to do so. For both music and traveling this is a natural proces where with music, you develop your own taste and specific likings, and with traveling a good gut feeling can save you from trouble.

In Flako’s ‘Mating Dance’ every component tributes to the foreign feeling that is written all over the song. It takes us to a place where you can imagine to still be a fair share of magic left from times that only exist in our thoughts. The song takes some time to develop, and it also takes time to get acquainted with some of its aspects. For example, before the kick hits, you hear a squeaking, fluit-like instrument that even now still hasn’t grown on us. But in regards to the context and influence on the atmosphere it is doing a rather good job.

And that’s the thing: most things come best into play in their natural environment. Just as you have to adjust to different cultures and can’t always get to the bottom of certain customs and habits, it is good to remember that that doesn’t mean it can’t be beautiful. 

Max Ferdinand
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Since he started doing solo projects and new collaborations aside from being one part of legendary duo Ame, Frank Wiedemann has soared. From his slow, poppy jams with RY X as part of The Howling to 6 hour soirees fuelled by his energy combined with Henrik Schwarz, Etienne Jaumet and others in a certain recently deceased club, everything Frank touches seems to turn to gold.

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Info
Artist: Alex Banks
Title: A Matter of Time (Frank Wiedemann Remix)
Label: Monkeytown Records
Catalog#: MTR049
Releasedate: 2014-09-05

Buy: BP

Social
Alex Banks: WEB | SC
Frank Wiedemann: FB
Monkeytown Records: WEB | FB | SC

Image:
Superfamous: WEB

 

Since he started doing solo projects and new collaborations aside from being one part of legendary duo Ame, Frank Wiedemann has soared. From his slow, poppy jams with RY X as part of The Howling to 6 hour soirees fuelled by his energy combined with Henrik Schwarz, Etienne Jaumet and others in a certain recently deceased club, everything Frank touches seems to turn to gold.

The man knows how to move a crowd, a talent that seems to pour out of all his veins. Just take this remix of Alex Banks: other producers would have undoubtedly taken the track with vocal into a deeper, more dubby territories (which aren’t unknown to Wiedemann). Frank on the other hand decided to go all out and record a dancefloor shattering session. Beautifully executed, it packs just the right amount of groove, build up and that ever present touch of melancholy. Great stuff.

Florinsz Janvier
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Allow us to introduce you to Thom East, the creator of our 31st podcast. This might be the first time you consciously read his name, yet he has been one of the driving forces behind SEKOIA for the last couple of years. As a resident DJ and a constant help on the production side of our events, he is the flag bearer for the darker music we’ve shared in the past.

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Info
Artist: Thom East
Label: SEKOIA
Based: Utrecht (NL)

Social:
Thom East: SC | FB
SEKOIA: WEBSC | FB

Image:
Superfamous: WEB

Allow us to introduce you to Thom East, the creator of our 31st podcast. This might be the first time you consciously read his name, yet he has been one of the driving forces behind SEKOIA for the last couple of years. As a resident DJ and a constant help on the production side of our events, he is the flag bearer for the darker music we’ve shared in the past.

His podcast will attest to that. In his own words: “For people interested in how I play DJ-sets in front of a crowd: I would like to invite those people to look around on my social channels, since there’s already a lot of my live material floating around.

The approach of this mix is a bit different. This podcast is my opportunity to tell a musical story. Taking some of the more abstract techno, combining records together and blending them by mixing really slowly and taking my sweet time. When mixing, I blur lines between one record and the next. In this way, the mix is quite a long trip, following waves and – hopefully – sucking you into it deeply.

I didn’t limit myself to a 60-minute time limit. I rather chose to let the music and its tides decide when and where it was the time to stop.”

Cédric
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Henry Saiz’s remix of Moon Observations start like any old sci-fi movie: industrious, mysterious and extraterrestrial. Weird FX are heard, acoustic percussion and underneath a firm bass that provides a sturdy rhythm. Although the cover of David Douglas’ EP implies that his Moon Observations were done from earth, we like to think that they were made onboard professor Calculus’ atomic rocket from Tintin’s “Destination Moon”. This because before the first break is introduced everything feels like a lift off. Tension and excitement, everything is working at maximum capacity and is counting down and prepared to break through earth’s atmosphere and gravitational pull. After that is is all smooth sailing, but you can feel the need to focus.

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Artist: David Douglas
Title: Moon Observations (Henry Saiz Remix)
Label: Atomnation
Catalog#: ATM022
Releasedate: 21-10-2014

Buy: BP | AN

Social
David Douglas: WEBSC | FB
Atomnation: BC

Image:
Viktor Hanacek: WEB

Henry Saiz’s remix of Moon Observations start like any old sci-fi movie: industrious, mysterious and extraterrestrial. Weird FX are heard, acoustic percussion and underneath a firm bass that provides a sturdy rhythm. Although the cover of David Douglas’ EP implies that his Moon Observations were done from earth, we like to think that they were made onboard professor Calculus’ atomic rocket from Tintin’s “Destination Moon”. This because before the first break is introduced everything feels like a lift off. Tension and excitement, everything is working at maximum capacity and is counting down and prepared to break through earth’s atmosphere and gravitational pull. After that is is all smooth sailing, but you can feel the need to focus.

While Henry Saiz introduces various themes and variations to the main theme, the whole song is driven by the big melody pad that puts everything into slipstream. Luckily the song includes enough ‘earthly’ sounds to keep the overall feeling warm and human.

Now we’ve past the four-minute barrier; time to look outside the window of our red and white rocket and witness the vast emptiness of space. It’s quite beautiful, and the lack of gravity lets you float around freely. Henry Saiz balanced his space interpretations quite well with a sturdy groove, preventing the whole thing from becoming some wishy washy thing. And next to that it is remarkable to realize that he kept so much energy of David Douglas’ original, giving the fact that that is a breakbeat song.

Henry Saiz’ strength in producing songs and remixes is that he can befool you with the tempo. You may think it has a steady, high pace, where in fact he almost keeps all of his productions at an incredibly low tempo. We believe that this phenomenon is one of the factors where you can recognize a good producer, because in a well produced song it doesn’t matter what all the different parameters are. It all blends together into an equation where one and one is three, because nothing acts as a stand alone factor.

Max Ferdinand
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Recapturing the radical self on a Monday. Not that there’s much left to recapture at this point. These Mondays in January are considered to be the most depressing days of the year. All the Christmas and NYE celebrations are done and now it’s time to come back to the real world. But still it’s far too cold to do anything fun outside, so we’re still stuck in our chairs.

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Artist: Sebastian Mullaert
Title: Recapturing The Radical Self
Label: Ovum Recordings
Catalog#: OVM244
Releasedate: 2014-06-30

Buy: BP

Social
Sebastian Mullaert: SC | FB
Ovum Recordings: WEB | FB

Image:
Lucas Löf: WEB

Recapturing the radical self on a Monday. Not that there’s much left to recapture at this point. These Mondays in January are considered to be the most depressing days of the year. All the Christmas and NYE celebrations are done and now it’s time to come back to the real world. But still it’s far too cold to do anything fun outside, so we’re still stuck in our chairs.

But hey! That means lots of time to discover new music, or to actually take time to listen to longer tracks like this one. Minilogue have always taken their time for their music, but since Sebastian Mullaert and Marcus Henriksson (now active under his moniker Nobody Home) each went their own way, it seems they’ve taken their artistic freedom to another level as well.

Sebastian is taking his time with this record, released on Josh Wink’s Ovum Recordings, exploring every corner of the little universes he’s able to create with his SH-101. All aboard the space train, just follow the bleeps and bounce along. Slowly drifting on the waves, the planets drift by. Press play and wake up somewhere totally different.

Florinsz Janvier
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Kiasmos is the collaboration between famed Icelandic experimental singer/songwriter Ólafur Arnalds and Faroese electronic musician and member of ‘Bloodgroup’ Janus Rasmussen. Kiasmos, hailing from the highly acclaimed Erased Tapes Records, has already made some waves, presumably because of both members’ previous garnered fame.

We would describe Kiasmos as SEKOIA’s ultimate pop group. Especially this song has a lot of pop sensibility, following more of a dance structure, whereas usually people try to do that the other way around: applying dance conventions to a pop song structure. Kiasmos’ music is melancholic, emotional, yet catchy. The songs are long and spun-out, but we expect that even people with the shortest of attention spans can remain focussed on Kiasmos’ songs, because who could not relate to that cute, simple, catchy though never boring glockenspiel-theme around the end of the song? It reminds us of those childhood glockenspiels where almost everyone learned to play their first notes of music on.

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Artist: Kiasmos
Title: Thrown
Label: Erased Tapes
Catalog#: ERATP044DL
Releasedate: 2012-09-21

Buy: WEB

Social
Kiasmos: SC | FB
Erased Tapes: WEBSC | FB

Image:
Jan Erik Waider: WEB

Kiasmos is the collaboration between famed Icelandic experimental singer/songwriter Ólafur Arnalds and Faroese electronic musician and member of ‘Bloodgroup’ Janus Rasmussen. Kiasmos, hailing from the highly acclaimed Erased Tapes Records, has already made some waves, presumably because of both members’ previous garnered fame.

We would describe Kiasmos as SEKOIA’s ultimate pop group. Especially this song has a lot of pop sensibility, following more of a dance structure, whereas usually people try to do that the other way around: applying dance conventions to a pop song structure. Kiasmos’ music is melancholic, emotional, yet catchy. The songs are long and spun-out, but we expect that even people with the shortest of attention spans can remain focussed on Kiasmos’ songs, because who could not relate to that cute, simple, catchy though never boring glockenspiel-theme around the end of the song? It reminds us of those childhood glockenspiels where almost everyone learned to play their first notes of music on.

If Kiasmos is able to crap out even one radio edit of their songs which concentrates all that brilliant simple emotional electronic music into less that 4 minutes, we can assure you that 2015’s festival season will feature one name on every billboard and that is Kiasmos. Would we welcome that? Of course. We hope that as many people will enjoy good music as humanly possible. – TS.

Tom Stigter
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Just a few hours ago the 38,5-hours closing weekend of TrouwAmsterdam, undoubtably the best club in The Netherlands, has come to an end. A big and emotional farewell to the club, restaurant and cultural space that has shaped a big and important part of the scene in The Netherlands.

Trouw-youngster extraordinaire Job Jobse, who had the honor to officially finish the last few hours of the weekend, teamed up with Barnt and David Hasert to put their feelings about the club into music. Not an easy task but, as we have come to know by these man, they succeed with flying colours.

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Info
Artist: Job Jobse, Barnt & David Hasert
Title: Cologne Megamix (Trouw Tribute)
Label: Trouw
Releasedate: 19-12-2014

Buy: WEB

Social
Job Jobse: SC | FB
Barnt: SC | FB
David Hasert: SC | FB
Trouw: WEB | SC | FB

Image: Unknown

Just a few hours ago the 38,5-hours closing weekend of TrouwAmsterdam, undoubtably the best club in The Netherlands, has come to an end. A big and emotional farewell to the club, restaurant and cultural space that has shaped a big and important part of the scene in The Netherlands.

Trouw-youngster extraordinaire Job Jobse, who had the honor to officially finish the last few hours of the weekend, teamed up with Barnt and David Hasert to put their feelings about the club into music. Not an easy task but, as we have come to know by these man, they succeed with flying colours.

Full feature on Trouw, their legacy and the future: here

 

Max Ferdinand
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Just a few hours ago the 38,5-hours closing weekend of Trouw, undoubtably the best club in The Netherlands, has come to an end. A big and emotional farewell to the club, restaurant and cultural space that has shaped a big and important part of the scene in The Netherlands. The venue has been around for six years and has altered the way we think of clubbing and frankly made us all a bunch of spoiled brats.

It’s funny to hear foreigners talk about Trouw and to read how media glorify the club nights and weekenders they’ve held for so long. They are very right to do so, and if someone would ask us our opinion about the club we wouldn’t tell them any differently. But in a way those are the moments we are reminded of the greatness of the club, since you have a tendency to get accustomed to great things that are very near to you. It is easy to get used to the quality of the music, the uniqueness of the building and the atmosphere during the nights if you go there almost every weekend. It’s like you’ve been flying a private jet for as long as you can remember; you get used to it.

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Just a few hours ago the 38,5-hours closing weekend of Trouw, undoubtably the best club in The Netherlands, has come to an end. A big and emotional farewell to the club, restaurant and cultural space that has shaped a big and important part of the scene in The Netherlands. The venue has been around for six years and has altered the way we think of clubbing and frankly made us all a bunch of spoiled brats.

It’s funny to hear foreigners talk about Trouw and to read how media glorify the club nights and weekenders they’ve held for so long. They are very right to do so, and if someone would ask us our opinion about the club we wouldn’t tell them any differently. But in a way those are the moments we are reminded of the greatness of the club, since you have a tendency to get accustomed to great things that are very near to you. It is easy to get used to the quality of the music, the uniqueness of the building and the atmosphere during the nights if you go there almost every weekend. It’s like you’ve been flying a private jet for as long as you can remember; you get used to it.

Trouw opened its doors in 2009 in a building of the eponymous Dutch newspaper. The facility used to hold the newspaper’s printing presses, heavy machines which produced a tremendous amount of sound, hence the whole building was properly isolated. A perfect venue to install the sound system from Trouw’s legendary predecessor Club 11. Trouw’s vision was to create a place that many would be able to call home. A place where it would be obvious that it was run by people who loved their work with a passion, nothing more and nothing less. The first and one of the last nights ever was hosted by, back then relatively unknown, Job Jobse and was called Drukpers. It stands model for the thought legacy of Trouw, which is to have faith in inspired and motivated people with an underlying bond of mutual respect and loyalty.

Hearing artists who are connected to Trouw is like listening to someone who tells a story about a relative. The communication between the club and its people transcended the normal business arrangements and created a more personal bond, which created a more lasting connection. All this could be traced back in everything you experienced on a club night. Because of this, everyone at the club had stepped out of anonymity and was recognizable and approachable. You knew who checked your coat, and you knew who hanged it. You knew the resident-DJ’s and you could see the owner, booker and promoter enjoying themselves in the back of the booth. Or at least there was somebody near you who could tell you who they were. Besides that, Trouw was one of the few clubs in Amsterdam that solely hosted their own parties. They did have label nights like Innervisions or Rush Hour, but every evening felt distinctly ‘Trouw’ which made it a coherent whole.


All factors above gave Trouw a very unique and distinct character, and it is this that made a lot of people fell in love with the venue. But simultaniously it caused a little bit of a dilemma: you can’t really compare Trouw to anything in Amsterdam or The Netherlands, and because of this, people started to look a bit too much to the Trouw logo as a sign of approval. You couldn’t blame them, Trouw indeed became that stamp of approval, but this made it more difficult for other venues to grow and develop. We’ve been fans of the club from start till end, but we also feel they’ve done right by closing. It was always emphasized that Trouw would be a temporary project, and it would be a shame if this would change for (possibly) commercial reasons, it wouldn’t fit their philosophy. No, we think the time has come, Trouw closes at its peak and this was exactly how it had to end.

Dying trees in a forrest allow light to reach the bottom floor giving lower plants air to breed and to excel. This is exactly what you can see is happening in Amsterdam at this moment. Some of the Trouw nights are finding shelter in other venues, and new clubs are opening as we speak, taking advantage of this new empty space in Dutch clubbing landscape. The old, although still relevant, is making way for the new and that’s the way it should be in a healthy scene. Trouw has enriched the Dutch scene a lot but now it’s time for somebody else to take this legacy forward. If you ask us if there will ever be a sequel to Trouw we’d say “possibly but not likely”. No club will ever be and feel as Trouw as it was a unique combination of elements (the building itself being a vital one), but their ideas and cultural heritage will endure and are inspiring new venues and promoters. Rumor has it that the ’Trouw-family’ is looking to continue their story in a new, yet to be found, space but creative mainstay Olaf Boswijk will not be the instigator. This weekend we closed an important chapter, an end of an era so to say, but we have exciting times ahead of us, and we are eager to find out how our capitals clubbing scene will look like once the smoke has settled.Thank you Trouw. Farewell!

 

until the music stops
Max Ferdinand
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